Rick Perry calls Texans to prayer

Texas Governor Rick Perry is hosting a nondenominational prayer summit in Houston where every organizer and speaker is a right-wing evangelical Christian

On August 6, Texas Republican governor and possible presidential candidate Rick Perry will host a prayer summit at Reliant Stadium in Houston.

rick perry praying
Thank you God for my nice hair

The event, dubbed “The Response” and funded by the American Family Association (which was labeled a “hate group” by the Southern Poverty Law Center), is designed to combat the economic, political, and spiritual crises facing the United States by returning the nation to its Biblical roots. Don’t bother taking your lunch, as well as prayer, it’s biblical-style fast-fest too.
 

When Rick Perry says “fellow Americans” he means “fellow evangelicals”

The Response’s website proclaims, “There is hope for America. It lies in heaven, and we will find it on our knees.” And in a video message Perry sent out this week, he noted, “I’m inviting you to join your fellow Americans for a day of prayer and fasting on behalf of our nation.” The Texas Governor should have been more concise what sort of “fellow Americans” he meant, for at this event only evangelicals will be allowed to share the podium with Rick Perry.
 

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Posted by on July 1, 2011. Filed under Commentary. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
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14 Responses to Rick Perry calls Texans to prayer

  1. The Lawyer

    July 1, 2011 at 10:17 am

    What a tool.

    • Jess

      July 1, 2011 at 1:21 pm

      Tools are at least useful for something. Governor Goodhair not so much, unless he is rimming the Koch brothers and Limbaugh’s asses. Sorry for the visual, I have brain bleach and a steel wool pad should any of you be in need of it.

  2. A Michael J. Scott

    July 1, 2011 at 10:33 am

    Living in America these days is downright frightening. We are slowly but surely becoming a theocracy.

  3. Robyn

    July 1, 2011 at 10:34 am

    So if his prayer thing is so effective, why is the Texas drought so much worse after he prayed for rain, than it was to begin with?

    • Cheshire Cat

      July 1, 2011 at 10:37 am

      You’re so right Robyn, but you’ll never convince these Jesus nuts of anything that looks to common sense. I’m with Mike on it and find the whole thing scary as hell. Glad I’m atheist.

  4. Collin Hinds

    July 1, 2011 at 10:37 am

    The thing that pisses me off the most about helmet-hair Perry is his previous smack talk about Texas seceding from the union, and now he’s talking about running for president of the same union he claimed he doesn’t want to be a part of. Does he believe his on bullshit?

    • Jim

      July 11, 2011 at 4:14 pm

      It seems you want christians completely silenced. It seems that the only people who need to have a voice is liberals muslims and atheist. Today in public schools a muslim has more rights than christians to express their faith. If Christians want to have a day of fasting and prayer what is to you. If I want to vote for Rick Perry what is it to you. You can hold whatever peaceable assembly you want. That’s America. You can vote your way I will vote my way.

  5. Jess

    July 1, 2011 at 1:19 pm

    Oh and his spokesmodel has already come out saying, if the Buddhists or them Mooslinz want to pray to their own gods they can do that, but not here, because they are just praying to Wall St AK47 Cheeses, in the stadium that day, since WSAK47C is the one true god. It would be idolatrous if we pray to another invisible sky daddy. When in the name of the invisible pink unicorn will these Talibangelicals get the fuck out of government is the question I want answered. Kind of same thing just happened in OH, when they pushed the forced birth law through, they were using buybull quotes to make law. These are the same morons that keep saying, we don’t want that damn Mooslim Sharia’h law anywhere near us, but WSAK47C law is all good.

    • Barton

      July 1, 2011 at 1:27 pm

      This is an affront to civilized society unless one includes the wacked out religious zealots as part of a civilized society. I hate Texas as much as I hate fireworks.

  6. Milton Thornridge

    July 1, 2011 at 5:45 pm

    Texas is a model for economic success in America. Prayer had much to do with this as Texas is an evangelically enlightened state.

    Try praying. Would do all of you some good also.

    • lazersedge

      July 2, 2011 at 1:35 am

      You idiot. Texas is in worst economic shape than California.

      • Collin Hinds

        July 2, 2011 at 10:08 am

        And according to the peace index that came out in April, Texas is in the top ten most violent states. Maybe they just need to pray harder until it gives them a head ache.

  7. mariegge

    July 12, 2011 at 8:00 pm

    There are those who hate Perry and those who don’t.
    There are those who hate Texas and those who don’t.
    There are those who hate God and those who don’t.
    I am hearing a lot of those who hate all of the above and few who don’t.
    Perhaps you are not as open minded and all inclusive as you claim to be. If they want to hold a meeting and invite like minded people, who are you to criticize? Will it interfere with your life at all? Probably not, so the bigger thing would be to let those who want to attend and pray, do it, and those who don’t respect their Constitutional right to do so, to choose to occupy your time and energy elsewhere.

    It’s the American way – or at least it has been since the founding of this country.

    • A Michael J. Scott

      July 13, 2011 at 11:47 am

      It’s a question of church and state. Perry represents, and poorly, the people of Texas. He shouldn’t be leading them into “prayer.” He should be holding town halls to find out what his state needs, not making irresponsible statements about heaven and some other mythical religious representation. Turning to Jesus tells me has doesn’t have the wherewithal to turn anywhere else, like common sense governing.